GamePark GP2X Wiz Review
Mar23

GamePark GP2X Wiz Review

OK, this review is probably a little too late in coming, but having just purchased a GP2X Wiz handheld and knowing how many of you out there are wondering just how good this fabled machine really is at emulating your favourite retro consoles, I felt I had to let you know my findings. The Purchase I purchased my GP2X Wiz from PlayAsia, as I have always been impressed by their service and prices. My Wiz and the official leather case cost me £121 including P+P and was sent from Hong Kong. Many UK suppliers are still selling this at £150 for just the handheld unit alone. Opening the box PlayAsia (Hong Kong) lived up to my expectations as usual and delivered within 5 working days. First impressions were that Gamepark have upped the quality of the packaging on their latest offering. Inside the box was the GP2X Wiz unit itself in a plastic bag, a mini-cd, a proprietary lead for connecting to PC USB and a ‘Quick Start’ guide. I was expecting to be supplied with a screen protector for the touch screen and maybe a spare stylus but was to be disappointed. The Hardware Initial thoughts on the Wiz: light and flimsy, cheap feeling. Looks great though. I can’t say I was impressed at all by the feel of the machine, the D-Pad and buttons rattle when the unit is moved around and it feels to light to be a ‘quality’ handheld. I’m not sure how much punishment this would take when pounding the buttons playing Track and Field in Mame4All. To the left of the screen is the D-Pad. D-Pad is an improvement on previous models but still doesn’t feel as good as a DS or PSP. There doesn’t seem to be any pivot point and it feels too spongy. Below the D-Pad is the ‘Menu’ button. To the right of the screen you have four buttons. The buttons (A, B, Y and X) are spaced to mimic the D-Pad and give the unit a nice aesthetic symmetry but I question the logic in having the buttons so close together. Time will tell if this makes certain games unplayable or not. Below the buttons is the ‘Select’ button. The top of the unit contains the shoulder buttons (bumpers), which feel ‘rattly’ and not really properly positioned in relation to the D-Pad and buttons to make games that require them all to be comfortable to play. In the centre top of the unit is the all important SD card slot. Either side of the screen are the speaker holes (speakers look tiny) and at the bottom of the...

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