The Story of the Oliver Twins Kickstarter launch event – new Dizzy game revealed
Oct25

The Story of the Oliver Twins Kickstarter launch event – new Dizzy game revealed

The impressive Centre for Computing History in Cambridge was the scene of the action yesterday as a new Kickstarter campaign to fund the new book on the Oliver Twins was launched. The book written by Chris Wilkins and Roger Kean will chronicle the astonishing rise of Andrew and Philip from their first type-in listing submitted to a magazine in 1983, to their first real success; Super Robin Hood and their days coding games for Code Masters which of course include the breathtaking successes of the Dizzy and Simulator series of games. The Story of the Oliver Twins book cover The computers were all available to use And lots to choose from! Explaining what the book is all about Showing some of the Twins’ earlier work A full house The Twins signing merchandise at the launch event Various Dizzy perks Signing Dizzy clocks Neil from indieretronews.com with software just signed by the Twins Yours truly with Andrew and Philip Chris and the Twins talked about the new Kickstarter book which was launched at 1 o’clock with a click on Chris’s mobile phone. There were opportunities for the attendees to then pledge on the campaign there and then in return for exclusive posters and postcards which Andrew and Philip were only too happy to sign. We were all also treated to a compelling talk by Archer Maclean, author of Dropzone, Jimmy Whites Whirlwind Snooker and Mercury. Wonderland Dizzy rediscovered And as if the Kickstarter campaign wasn’t enough, at 4 o’clock we were all treated to the big Dizzy reveal, which was undoubtedly the highlight of the day for many there. The rediscovered disk containing the source data for Wonderland Dizzy Wonderland Dizzy artwork A mock up of the Wonderland Dizzy NES cartridge and box Box art front Box art back A video was shown of the recent Play Event where the Twins had shown a map of Wonderland Dizzy for Nintendo’s NES, which they could remember finishing but had never had published. Further investigation of the attic later revealed a floppy disk, which with much help from Andrew Joseph of yolkfolk.com and Lucasz Kur, they were able to get working and debugged. The game is now available to play for FREE at wonderlanddizzy.com thanks to the generosity of Andrew and Philip. Pledge on ‘The Story of The Oliver Twins’ book...

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Head 2 Head: Double Dragon – Sega Master System vs NES
Jul23

Head 2 Head: Double Dragon – Sega Master System vs NES

Number four in our new series of face-offs between classic games on rival consoles. The aim of Head2Head is not to say which console I think is the greatest (all consoles have their own particular strengths and weaknesses), but rather to examine the same game released for rival consoles and to say in the fairest possible way which I think was the best at the time. This episode features the home version of the arcade smash hit Double Dragon, originally developed by Technos Japan and distributed in Europe and North America by Taito in 1987. The game was then released in 1988 on the NES and Master System followed by releases on Atari 2600, 7800, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC464, Amiga, Atari ST and MegaDrive. The idea for this Head 2 Head came from a conversation on Twitter with Danny Major (@GuyFawkesRetro), well worth a follow! Graphics At first glance, the Sega Master System seems to have this one licked, but first appearances can be deceptive. Yes, the colours are brighter, the characters more detailed and the intro screen is much better, but play the game a while and you will realise that whilst some degree of thought has gone into the NES screens, the same cannot be said of the SMS version. Double Dragon on the SMS has bland, featureless screens with little or no thought to actual interaction between characters and scenery. The NES also has splash screens announcing the next level, something which they clearly couldn’t be bothered with on the SMS version. Both versions have numerous glitches and bugs regarding the screen redraw, with flickery sprites and characters only being half redrawn when knocked to the ground being just two of many issues. These issues are more prominent on the SMS version especially on boss levels and this along with the lack of graphical detail gives the NES a win. Sound From the intro music, through to the level-start and in-game sound effects, there is only one winner here and that is the Sega Master System. Gameplay This one proved to be a bit tougher. Both had so many flaws that they almost cancelled each other out. Poor collision detection on the SMS makes it almost unplayable especially on boss levels. The fact that only 2 enemies appear on the screen compared to the 3 on the SMS gives Sega’s effort the advantage in that area. Better screen design on the NES version make playing it more enjoyable than its SMS counterpart. The SMS does have 2 player co-op which is something that the NES version sadly lacks but even that can’t make up...

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Google Maps in 8-Bit – April Fools Joke
Apr02

Google Maps in 8-Bit – April Fools Joke

Sure to appeal to all Retro Gamers worldwide was this years Google April Fools joke. Its latest ‘product’ was entitled Quest, and was a version of Google Maps rendered in 8-Bit adventure style a la NES. It even renders Streetview in 8-Bit style graphics making the view of your local area a lot more interesting. Google created the orientation video below to help you get started, and remember… “blow on the cartridge to fix bugs”. To start your Quest and to see Google Maps in all their 8-Bit glory click...

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