Crash Annual 2018 – Kickstarter update
Aug01

Crash Annual 2018 – Kickstarter update

As we reported in our last article, the Crash Annual 2018 Kickstarter campaign got off to an astonishing start – reaching its £12,000 goal within 9 hours. That was just the beginning of the story though and currently – with 18 days to go (at time of writing) the campaign is funded 258% and stands at over £31,000. Stretch goals have been announced and subsequently smashed. Backers can already expect to have a 38mm Crash badge and a beautiful Crash covers calendar included with their Annuals. We are sure there will be plenty more to come too! Stretch goal 1: Crash Badge Stretch Goal 2: Crash Calendar The mainstream and gaming press have also been going crazy over the campaign to bring everyone’s favourite Spectrum magazine back too. Articles have now appeared on Kotaku, The Independent, Eurogamer and the Metro’s pages. Metro The Independent Eurogamer.net Kotaku Stay tuned for all the latest developments and of course, if you haven’t already done so, head on over to the Crash Annual 2018 Kickstarter page and see what all the fuss is about for...

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Crash Annual 2018 – Kickstarter
Jul23

Crash Annual 2018 – Kickstarter

The legendary Crash magazine is set to return next year with issue 99 being produced by Fusion Retro books after successfully funding their Kickstarter campaign in around 9 hours. Along with original Newsfield Owner/Editor Roger Kean and original artist Oliver Frey, Chris Wilkins is bringing the publication back in the style of a hardback annual which will feature much of what has happened in the Spectrum universe since the last Crash went to print 26 years ago. Reviews will play a big part in the Annual Famous name such as Simon Butler will have their own sections Crash Mug perk The exact cover art will be kept secret but it will be by Oli Frey so it will be good! Crash Wallet perk. Crash Watch perk Chris – who has worked alongside Oli and Roger on a number of other projects – has reached out to the Spectrum community for input, with some big names from back in the day such as Simon Butler, Jas Austin, Steve Wetherill and the Oliver Twins responding and contributing articles. Reviews are being written by Spectrum users, just as they were when Crash was the top selling Spectrum magazine in the UK, Nick Roberts will be taking up his ‘playing tips’ section again and Stuart Williams will be taking up the ‘Adventure Trail’ section, all helping to keep the annual’s format familiar to fans. Lloyd Mangram has even been tempted out of retirement to answer readers letters 😉 To top it all off there are some amazing perks to be had including Crash branded mouse mats, wallets, mugs, t-shirts, watches, canvases and even a framed ‘Oli-Bug’! Stretch goals have yet to be decided but are likely to include badges, a calendar a cassette based game by Jonathan Cauldwell featuring none other than Egg-Head. All in all, this is shaping up to be an unmissable treat for Spectrum fans new or old. If you haven’t pledged yet, please do so, lets make this Annual all it can be! Check out the Crash Annual 2018 Kickstarter page here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/47744432/crash-annual-2018-the-next-chapter...

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Spectrum Addict film cover art by Oliver Frey revealed
Jun09

Spectrum Addict film cover art by Oliver Frey revealed

The upcoming film by Andy Remic – Memoirs of a Spectrum Addict now has an amazing looking cover, produced by none other than the renowned artist Oliver Frey, famous amongst gamers of course for his Crash and Zzap! 64 magazine artwork. We think it looks amazing and really captures the look and feel of those iconic 80s Crash magazine covers. There are still a couple of days left to get your own name in the film credits so head on over to remicmedia.com/speccyaddict/ and order a...

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Spectrum Vega+ hands on – video and mini review
Apr09

Spectrum Vega+ hands on – video and mini review

Playing Halls of the Things Playing Halls of the Things The Spectrum Vega+ on top of an original Spectrum for size comparison Ant Harper surprised at how small the Vega actually is Will thought the size about right Will plays with a Vega+ This report was written by Will Woodvine, photography and video by Ant Harper. Disclosure: I backed the Vega+ Indiegogo campaign but requested and received a refund over the Christmas period. I asked for a refund due to what I perceive to be the appalling lack of information provided to backers. The opinion below is my own and is not influenced by inducement or coercion by any parties. It is written as a fan of the ZX Spectrum. I attended the Dizzy event with no knowledge that the Spectrum Vega+ would be present, so was unprepared. Like any true retro-gaming fan I spent Saturday 8th April, the sunniest and warmest day of the year so far, in a darkened room with no windows looking at computer games. The event was the Dizzy 30th anniversary in Nottingham. This took the form of a presentation by the Oliver Twins which covered their early years, mentioned the ZX81 (huzzah!) and gave me a greater insight in to the Dizzy world. At the start of the presentation a gentleman (who I think was Lee Fogarty) came down to the front and handed one of the Twins a white box. Inside was a Vega+. This was shown to the crowd, causing a slight stirring, and then placed on the podium. At the end presentation the Vega+ was left unattended so I took the opportunity to grab it and have a close look. At no time was there any interference from anyone or any attempt made to stop me from using it or Ant Harper, Simon Williams or Simon Osborne from using, photographing or videoing the device. I believe the device to be the pre-production device that has been seen previously. The hardware The device feels good in the hands, fitting well – I have medium sized hands. I gave the unit a torsional twist and the unit did not flex, which reinforced the positive feel of the device. The screen is bright and clear, easily read by someone who normally needs glasses to read and wasn’t wearing them. The buttons were an issue being unresponsive – you have to press them precisely for them to react. This maybe the “switch re-design” referred to by RCL. Simon Osborne has reported that he used a corrected production unit and the buttons were much more responsive. The spectrum flash is a sticker (peeling now) and...

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The Little Book of Sinclair ZX Spectrum Games by Chris Wilkins – review
Sep23

The Little Book of Sinclair ZX Spectrum Games by Chris Wilkins – review

I will start out with a confession – that here at Retro Games Collector we are unashamed fans of the work of Retro Fusion Books. Their publications hit the sweet-spot of quality, content and price and it shows with The ZX Spectrum in Pixels trio, Commodore 64 in Pixels and The Story of US Gold books, all scoring an unprecedented top mark of 5/5 in our reviews. This latest book – The Little Book of Sinclair ZX Spectrum Games – combines a selection of the games covered in The ZX Spectrum in Pixels books, plus a few new ones – in a small, neat, hardback format which Chris based upon the popular Ashens book; Terrible Old Games You’ve Probably Never Heard Of. The book itself measures 162 x 162mm making it Fusion Retro’s smallest book yet. Inside the book As already stated, The Little Book of Sinclair ZX Spectrum Games is small and square in format with a nice matte black finish to the hardcover giving it a compact, classy feel. Within those covers there are 144 pages with a whopping 1oo games covered, interspersed with a foreword by Chris, images of the ZX Spectrum range of computers (from the 16K rubber key original to the +3) and Oliver Frey’s amazing magazine cover artwork. The games secreted within are now broken up intro genres; Sports Games, Arcade Adventure, Arcade, Adventure, Strategy/Puzzle, Fighting, Racing and Platform – with every game nicely indexed on the last few pages. Each game is given one page, with the synopsis underneath a screenshot of the game in question and a Crash magazine review score (if applicable) listed alongside. What is striking about Fusion Retro’s diminutive new offering is its overall feel of quality. The paper used is 150gsm which in non-printer speak means they are thicker than the norm, helping toward the quality feel that permeates throughout this title. The print quality is also noteworthy, with the screenshots bright, crisp and colourful, just like Spectrum graphics were… once we tuned our tellies in anyway. In Summary Another fantastic addition to the Fusion Retro Books stable. Absolutely perfect as a present for the Speccy-phile in your life (or for yourself!) especially with Christmas just around the corner. Even if you have the ‘in Pixels’ books already, this is still a must-buy with its handier ‘pocket’ size, great quality printing and extra reviews. No surprise then that this book also gets full marks from us. Pre-order your copy of The Little Book of Sinclair ZX Spectrum Games...

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ZX Spectrum Games Code Club by Gary Plowman – review
Sep06

ZX Spectrum Games Code Club by Gary Plowman – review

Gary Plowman (AKA Gazzapper Games) sent me the ZX Spectrum Games Code Club to review quite a while back now. Unfortunately for him I have been building my upcoming (yes, and it is close!) retro gaming store and that got in the way of my penning this review. What I did make time for however, in between sorting, scanning and listing software titles, was a thorough read of the book in question. I often reminisce about those early home computing days back in the 80s, when I would spend hours hunched over my ZX81 or Spectrum and a copy of Sinclair Programs, painstakingly typing out listing after listing and carefully saving the resulting program to tape. Often there would be a mistake in the listing itself, or you would type something incorrectly meaning you would have to spend another few hours or so fixing it. The term debugging was rarely used by schoolboys on their Spectrums in front of the living room TV back in the 80s, but debugging was exactly what it was and it taught us plenty. Many of us have gone on to have successful careers in computing and have found the lessons learned back then invaluable and often transferable to modern day programming languages. Fast forward to the present day and ZX Spectrum Games Code Club by Gary Plowman uses program listings in the same BASIC language we used back then as a tool for teaching yourself the rudimentary skills needed to code, using – and here is the best part – an actual ZX Spectrum or a Spectrum emulator. And this is why I am so enthused about this book. In essence it takes us back to the roots of games design. Back to a time when every byte counted and 16 or 48K was often all you had to play around with. A time of programming without waste. Inside the book As stated in the introduction, the book is primarily written to teach you how to program in Sinclair BASIC. This is achieved through a series of games listings which you need to input into your chosen ZX Spectrum (or Spectrum emulator). Firstly though, you are taken through some of the more basic commands, an explanation of Spectrum-specific features, emulator keyboard mapping, how to save your work – either to good old cassette or microdrive – and some tips to make typing in code a whole lot easier. There are 20 games listings in total, each followed by a comprehensive run-down of the programming techniques used and what they achieve. You are encouraged to experiment, modify and extend the listings yourself at every...

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