Sega Saturn clock battery replacement – how to
Sep05

Sega Saturn clock battery replacement – how to

Imagine this. You plug in your Sega Saturn, grab your Virtua gun, load up your well loved copy of Virtua Cop… and this appears: You almost rage destroy the gun as its a royal ball-ache trying to navigate the time and date setting process using the buttons on your gun and you’re being too lazy to reach for a pad. Well the answer to all your prayers is here. Now before I begin, this is probably the most difficult console fix ever. It involves a no-solder technique and should not be attempted by anyone under the age of 2. So here goes. Take your Saturn and turn it around to look at the back, That flap to the left? Take it off. Grab your replacement battery – a CR2032, I bought this pack from a £1 shop for…  you guessed it, £1 !!! Flick the old battery out, replace it with a new one and replace the flap. Fire up your console, and set your time and date! Switch off and back on to ensure its working properly and BOOM!  You’ve done it, give yourself a pat on the...

Read More
PAL Sega Megadrive Region Switch Mod – how to
Jul12

PAL Sega Megadrive Region Switch Mod – how to

Many a tutorial has been written regarding the Sega Megadrive Region Switch mod. This modification will release the true power of the MD and enable you to play Japanese and American games on your PAL console with the flip of a switch. Most tutorials you find will use two toggle switches, however I prefer to use a single switch. The switch we will be using a on/off/on switch and I opt for a black rocker switch to try and make it look like it was always meant to be there. We shall assume you have basic soldering skills and that you are versed in undoing screws!! Tear down Begin your mods by flipping the console over and undoing the screws on the underside. Put them safe in a handy pot and remove the top half of the console. To separate the top from the bottom you will need to unplug the power led, you can change that if you fancy, my personal Megadrive has a white power led. To unplug you will need to straighten the legs sticking out of the white plug and gentle wiggle until its free. Put the top to one side for now. Next up is to remove the metal shield. Its held down with several screws and hooked under a tab on the bottom shield. To remove the motherboard, there is one screw on either side of the cartridge connector. Lift the headphone jack out to reveal another screw and there is a few in the thick aluminium angled piece. Remove the motherboard, it is also hooked into the bottom tin piece. And the bottom tin lifts out. Cue cleaning, I give mine a gentle scrub with a sponge in the hot soapy water and leave it to dry. Be careful using a scrubbing brush or the scratchy pad on sponges, this will scratch up the console and leave a matt finish. Not the end of the world but it takes elbow grease to re-polish it. Whilst this is drying, use a wire brush to remove any rust from the tins, mine where quite bad where they had sat in a loft or shed for sometime. Give it a spray with WD40 or something to help protect them in the future and pat dry. Work can now begin on the soldering. I like to prepare my switch and wire first, so fire up your iron and grab a beer whilst you wait. On the switch itself I give the contacts a light emery to reveal the copper, because the solder will not work on the plated surface. Apply the heat and melt some solder...

Read More
Retro Collective – a group to be proud of
May17

Retro Collective – a group to be proud of

As I make the finishing touches to this article, there is a knock at my door. It’s the postman. I thank him, I close the door and rush into my lounge eager to find out what’s inside my parcel. I tear it open like a kid on Christmas day, just like I do every time a new game drops at my door. The Legend of Zelda This parcel epitomises the game group I’ve grown to love, the members of it I have come to trust and call my friends. Inside is a copy of The Legend of Zelda for NES,  the game I’ve been looking out for and to snag at a reasonable price is on an I.O.U. Now I didn’t suggest that it was sent to me before I had the means to pay, however the seller trusts that because we are both members of Retro Collective Europe, I’ll pay up when I said I would. But wait, I know what your thinking, that parcel looks a bit overkill for a singular NES cart. And that’s because the sender also sent me a free gift. It was sent because he knew I’d love it. I knew it was coming but I didn’t know what it was, a real surprise when I saw inside. To say I’m astounded is an understatement, as I opened it I really did gasp. The generosity and pure kind heartedness is a example to us all. It really shows that our community is full of wonderful humans. All I can say is a really, really big thank you to Jamiu – you true gentleman! (go follow him on IG @gvil77) Welcome to Retro Collective In order to find out where Retro Collective started, I spent over an hour chatting with co founder Jerry Herring via Skype. We chatted about a multitude of things including music, things we had seen on Instagram, games and sweets (candy to our cousins across the water). He told me about his impending relocation and I informed him of my sleepless nights with a newborn baby. Another example of the community Retro Collective is! So Jerry gave me the low-down on how Retro Collective began. Through the group I’ve had consoles modded, been given advice on how to mod consoles, bought games for my collection and sold/traded games to members of the group. – RCE Member Just like all of us it began when Jerry aka @sbkretro joined Instagram, and like most he began posting pictures of games and figuring out hashtags. Via Instagram he came into contact with @bowserisking. They became friends and often chatted via social media. One...

Read More